Categories
Current Affairs articles

Prayer or Protest?

“In Islamic History protests have always made changes. When the Crusaders took over Jerusalem, the Muslims protested in Baghdad.” Shaykh Yasir Qadhi, Texas

When Imam Ahmad ibn Hanbal RH was incarcerated by Mu’tasim his students protested outside the palace of the Caliph. If you are a woman reading this, how can you forget the Suffragette movement that gave women a voice? If you are an Indian or Pakistani reading this, how can you forget Gandhi’s Salt March against the British? If you are non-White reading this, remember George Floyd’s protests a few years ago, fighting for all non-whites in America? Lesson: Protests are powerful!

Protests create awareness for Muslims and non-Muslims. Are you telling me a millions people in London last weekend didn’t raise eyebrows? “What’s going on here?” It was all over the news! People will talk and ask questions about Palestine thanks to demonstrations. What about the people in Gaza? When they see protests all over the world they know we are with them, it gives them hope despite dark times.

One of the biggest objections against protests and protestors is they don’t pray Salah, but march in their thousands?! My question to these religious folk is, is Salah a condition to carry out good deeds? We all know Salah is fardh, but if someone doesn’t pray Salah, they can’t give sadaqah? They can’t listen to an Islamic lecture? We need to start somewhere… Many people have started Salah because of the situation in Gaza.

وَأَن لَّيْسَ لِلْإِنسَـٰنِ إِلَّا مَا سَعَىٰ ٣٩

“And that each person will only have what they endeavoured towards.” What’s the point of Protests, you guys haven’t conquered alMasjid alAqsa? We can only make an effort, the results are in the hands of Allah SWT. Many people died fighting for things they didn’t see the results of, like the suffragette movement for women, and Malcolm X for black people in America. If we raise our voices for Palestine, our children or grandchildren will see the results, In Sha Allah

Remember the story of the prostitute who fed a dog water, she was forgiven i.e. granted Jannah. Was she regular in Salah? She fed a dog. Imagine the reward for helping humans, Muslims, Palestinians in the most blessed lands. Whether they pray Salah or not, wear a Hijab or not, you don’t have a right to become judge and jury. Many people who attend the masjid for bayans don’t pray regular Salah, most the jumuah congregation doesn’t pray x5. Where are they all week? Please. Ask them.

There are many flaws to your objections and the truth of the matter is most these Ulama and Tablighis objecting can’t be bothered protesting. We never forced you to. It’s always the وحده لا شريك له whole and soul attitude. “Our work is better” holier than thou… Alhumdu Lillah I am a protestor and clearly a loud and proud one, and have been for many years. But I will not say I am better than those whose line of work is different, because that is the work of God Almighty.

Ismail Ibn Nazir Satia (one who is in need of Allah’s forgiveness, mercy and pleasure).

Categories
Current Affairs articles

Educating Our Children About Palestine

Whether your Chîldrėn ask you or not, you must tell them that we *L♡VĖ* Palestine because… 

*01:* Palestine has been the land of the Prophets, peace be upon them all. 

*02:* Prophet Ibrahim عَــلَيْه السَّـلاَم first migrated to Palestine. 

*03:* Allah Ta’ala saved Prophet Lut عَــلَيْه السَّـلاَم from the punishment that had befallen his people in Palestine. 

*04:* Prophet Dawood عَــلَيْه السَّـلاَم lived in this land and built a masjid here.

*05:* Prophet Sulaiman عَــلَيْه السَّـلاَم used to sit in this country and rule over the whole world.

*06:* The famous story of the ant and Sulaiman عَــلَيْه السَّـلاَم in the Quran, in which an ant said to the rest of his ants, “O ants, get into your burrows and hide” happened right here in a valley in the city of Ashkelon in this country, which was later named “Wadi al-Naml” – Valley of the Ants”.

*07:* The mihrab/prayer place of Prophet Zakariyya عَــلَيْه السَّـلاَم is also in this city of Jerusalem. 

*08:* Prophet Musa عَــلَيْه السَّـلاَم told his companions about this country and to enter this holy city. He called this city holy because of its being free from shirk and being the land of Prophets. 

*09:* Many miracles took place in this city, including the blessed birth of Jesus from the blessed and pure virgin Sayyidina Maryam.

*10:* When his people wanted to kill Prophet Isa عَــلَيْه السَّـلاَم 

*Âllåh (ﷻ)* took him up to the heavens from Jerusalem. 

*11:* After giving birth, when a woman is at the extreme of her physical weakness, Sayyidina Maryam’s shaking of the palm trunk to get dates in such a state is also a divine miracle. 

*12:* One of the signs of the Day of Judgement will be the return of Isa to the earth in this city. 

*13:* Prophet Isaa عَــلَيْه السَّـلاَم will kill the Dajjal at Bab Lud in this land. 

*14:* Palestine is the land where everyone will be raised, resurrected and judged. 

*15:* It is from this city that Gog and Magog will start fighting and rioting across the earth. 

*16:* One of the Quranic stories that happened in this city is the story of Talut and Goliath and Talut’s triumph over Goliath.

*17:* Palestine also has the honour of being the first Qibla of Muslims after the five prayers became obligatory. After the Hijra, Sayyidina Jibreel عَــلَيْه السَّـلاَم directed our Prophet *ﷺ* to turn his face from Masjid al-Aqsa (Jerusalem) to the Kaaba (Makkah) during prayer. The mosque in which this incident took place is still called the Qiblatin Mosque. 

*18:* The Holy Prophet *صَلَّى اللَّهُ عَلَيْهِ وَسَلَّم* was brought here from Makkah to Bayt al-Maqdis (Jerusalem) before he was taken to heavens on the night of Ascension. 

*19:* All the Prophets عَــلَيْه السَّـلاَم 

prayed here behind our Prophet *ﷺ* Thus, Palestine once again became the land of all the Prophets.

*20:* Sayyidina Abu Dharr *رَضِيَ اللّهُ عَنْهُ* says that I asked the Messenger of *Âllåh (ﷻ)* *صَلَّى اللَّهُ عَلَيْهِ وَسَلَّم* , which was the first mosque built on earth? So he said: Masjid al-Haram (i.e. the Kaaba). I asked which one? (When the mosque was built) he said: Al-Aqsa Mosque (i.e. Bait al-Maqdis). I then asked how much time was there between the two of them? The Prophet *ﷺ* said: “Forty years, and whenever you can, you should pray there” 

*21:* After the departure of the Prophet *ﷺ*, Sayyidina Abu Bakr *رَضِيَ اللّهُ عَنْهُ* dealt with the wars of apostasy and false prophets. Despite the dire need of military resources and manpower to deal with these many battlefronts, it is also an unforgettable fact that the army prepared by the Prophet *ﷺ* was still sent by Abubakr *رَضِيَ اللّهُ عَنْهُ* to liberate the land of Palestine.

*22:* In the golden era of Islam, Sayyidina Umar as Khalifah, leaving aside all the other numerous Muslim conquests around the world, solely for the liberation of Palestine, himself went from Madinah and prayed there, highlighting the importance and greatness of this city.

*23:* The re-conquest of this city by Salahudidn Ayyubi on Friday 27th Rajab 583 Hijri on the night of Mi’raj is also a sign of Allah.

24: The name of Jerusalem is also Bait al-Maqdis and Al Quds due to the sanctity and holiness of this city which distinguishes it from all other cities. More than 5000 Companions of the Prophet sacrificed their lives to acquire this city and save it from the oppression and tyranny of the Christian Romans. And that chapter of martyrdom is not closed until this day. This city of Jerusalem is thus also known as the city of martyrs.

Categories
Current Affairs articles

An Eye-Watering Story

I am Gujarati: Hands Off My Mosque

ومن أظلم ممن منع مساجد الله أن يذكر فيها اسمه

“And who is more oppressive than he who prevents the mosques of Allah from mentioning His name.”

I write this with a heavy heart and a tear in my eye, never before have I written on behalf of someone who is deceased. That’s right, this message is on behalf of a girl who passed away aged 7.
Before she passed away she desired to visit a Masjid, the house of Allah, but she was refused from several Gujarati Masjids in Blackburn. Why?

One Masjid said her wheelchair will make our carpets dirty?!


Another Masjid said, if we have a fire she will cause a hazard! (She wanted a tour, not admission).


The Masjid that finally gave permission said, just look from the shoe racks??? Which she did and tearfully said, “Mum, is it because I am disabled I didn’t get a proper tour?” Heartbreaking!


In the end, the Abu Hanifah Foundation gave her a proper tour, their students sang Nasheeds for her and gave her a crystal frame…

THIS IS ISLAM! Respect to AHF, I salute you. 


And shame on the others, you disgust me. I must mention that the girl was a Pakistani and Pakistani is not a code word for Patels. Maybe if she was a Patel, she would have been allowed? 


Dear Gujarati Masters,
I’ll call you by the title you love, let me massage that ego for you. I’m happy to be your slave and servant. Your Masjids are no longer the houses of Allah, they are clubs, where the Gujarati Master throws his weight around and stamps his authority down. Perhaps it doesn’t work at home on the wife and kids?


If your heart doesn’t irk with this story you need to do an “Iman test” toooo many people testing for Corona and not checking that their Iman is positive. Just because these Imams don’t have disabled children, that doesn’t mean you don’t care about disabled children. This family is not related to me, nor do we have disabled children in the family, Alhumdu lillah… but the story still bothered me for nights. 


Before you blame committees of the Masajid… stop right there! The family approached the Imams who are very outspoken on the Mimbar but fragile on the inside I guess, it’s easy to talk the talk I guess. Gujaratis are good for establishing institutions, but not for establishing JUSTICE!

Ulama are incompetent when it comes to these diversity issues. Islam is not just about Salah and Sawm. Islam is a diverse religion, let Ulama open their minds, open their hearts and open their Masajid.

Ismail ibn Nazir Satia (one who is in dire need of Allah’s forgiveness, mercy and pleasure)

24 Muharram 1442

Categories
Current Affairs articles

Pride, Power and Politics

An Open Letter to the People in Power

“The way (of blame) is only against those who oppress men and rebel in the earth without justification; for such there will be a painful torment.” [al-Shoora 42:42]‏.‏ 

Abu Bakr As-Siddiq (Allah be pleased with him) said: “O you people! You recite this Ayah: Take care of yourselves! If you follow the guidance no harm shall come to you. I indeed heard the Messenger of Allah (s.a.w) saying: ‘When the people see the wrongdoer and they do not take him by the hand, then soon Allah shall envelop you in punishment from him.'” (Jami`at-Tirmidhi, Book 33, Hadith 11)

This is a disclaimer before the letter starts, this letter is being written after having worked with Muslims, for Muslims, helping Muslims and working within the Muslim community, realising all is not what it seems and all that glitters is not gold. Many people who seem to be religious and practising are not as holy and angelic and sanctimonious on the inside as they may seem on the outside. A lot of people in power don’t seem to use their power justly and productively, rather they abuse their power unlawfully, unfairly and unethically. After working for Muslims, I started to look at everything from a leadership lens. The good and bad of every school, masjid, organisation, family and even country were directly related to the quality of their leaders.  The aim and purpose of this letter is to remind those in leadership and in power of their duty and the fact that they are answerable to Allah. You have been put in a position to lead by the book of Allah SWT and deal with people fairly and justly as Allah states in the Qur’an:

He be exalted, says (interpretation of the meaning): “Verily, Allah enjoins Al-Adl (i.e. justice and worshipping none but Allah Alone – Islamic Monotheism) and Al-Ihsan (i.e. to be patient in performing your duties to Allah, totally for Allahs sake and in accordance with the Sunnah (legal ways) of the Prophet SAW in a perfect manner), and giving (help) to kith and kin (i.e. all that Allah has ordered you to give them e.g., wealth, visiting, looking after them, or any other kind of help, etc.): and forbids Al-Fahsha (i.e all evil deeds, e.g. illegal sexual acts, disobedience of parents, polytheism, to tell lies, to give false witness, to kill a life without right, etc.), and Al-Munkar (i.e all that is prohibited by Islamic law: polytheism of every kind, disbelief and every kind of evil deeds, etc.), and Al-Baghy (i.e. all kinds of oppression), He admonishes you, that you may take heed” [an-Nahl 16:90]. 

When leadership is great, success inevitably follows. Likewise, when leadership is poor, failure inevitably follows. Think about it: give me some examples of successful countries, businesses and masjids and I will point you in the direction of the strong leader that orchestrated their success. This letter can be forwarded to Ulama, Imams, Chaplains, Principals of Madrasahs/Darul Ulooms, Headteachers of Boys/Girls Schools, as well as Muslim MPS and Councillors, it can be even sent to Non-Muslims in the above positions.

Abdullah bin Umar (Allah be pleased with him) reported: The Messenger of Allah ﷺ, peace and blessings be upon him, said, “All of you are shepherds and each of you is responsible for his flock. An Imam is a shepherd and he is responsible for those in his care. A man is a shepherd in respect of his family and is responsible for those in his care. The woman is a shepherd in respect of her husband’s house and is responsible for what is in her care. The servant is a shepherd in respect of his master’s property and is responsible for what is in his care. All of you are shepherds and each of you is responsible for his flock.”

What is the modern-day equivalent to the word shepherd in this hadith? IT IS A LEADER! So re-read the hadith above, but this time, replace the word shepherd with the word leader.

I believe that it is our responsibility to become leaders, because that’s what our beloved Prophet ﷺ taught us to be, and that is what he was. He exemplified leadership in all areas of his life, and, if we are truly followers of his example, then we will seek to do the same. Also, by looking at the life of the Prophet Muhammad ﷺ through this lens of leadership, my hope is that we will gain an even greater appreciation of how incredible he was, and our love for him will increase. We will gently remind those in power of their duties and qualities which naturally over time wear off, but need to be revivified.

To Begin…

  1. Ikhlaas – Sincerity is very important before taking up any position. You must be doing it for the sake of Allah SWT and to seek his pleasure. Narrated ‘Umar bin Al-Khattab: I heard Allah’s Messenger (ﷺ) saying, “The reward of deeds depends upon the intentions and every person will get the reward according to what he has intended. So whoever emigrated for worldly benefits or for a woman to marry, his emigration was for what he emigrated for.” (Bukhari) Some intentions to make and questions to ask yourself:

How are we influencing or making a positive impact in the world?

How are we influencing our families, communities, co-workers, children, cities and countries?

If the Prophet’s mission was about changing the world, shouldn’t ours be too? Should we not also be people of influence?

We are only doing this role to please Allah, not for worldly gain.

2. Fear of Allah – Narrated Ma’qil (Allah be pleased with him): I heard the Prophet (peace be upon him) saying, “Any man whom Allah has given the authority of ruling some people and he does not look after them in an honest manner, will never feel even the smell of Paradise.”  (Bukhari, Vol. 9, Book 89, Hadith 264)

Before making any decision, before advising anyone, before deploying someone, you must think of Allah SWT and remember that you will need to answer to Him one day.

Nepotism is growing uncontrollably, people are given preference because of family ties, or because of beauty and honour and lineage. Whereas preference should always be given to the best man for the job. “O mankind! We have created you from a male and a female, and made you into nations and tribes, that you may know one another. Verily, the most honourable of you with Allah is that (believer) who has At-Taqwa [i.e. he is one of the Muttaqoon (the pious)]. Verily, Allah is All-Knowing, AllAware” [al-Hujuraat 49:13] 

The advisors of the Messenger included Muslim men of all tribes, races and colours. Their hearts were filled with Tawheed and they were brought together by their faith and piety – such as Abu Bakr (Allah be pleased with him) from Quraysh, ‘Ali ibn Abi Talib (Allah be pleased with him) from Bani Hashim, Bilal the Ethiopian (Allah be pleased with him), Suhayb the Roman (Allah be pleased with him), Salman the Persian (Allah be pleased with him), rich men like ‘Uthman (Allah be pleased with him) and poor men like ‘Ammaar (Allah be pleased with him), people of means and poor people like Ahl al-Suffah, and others (Allah be pleased with them all).

Abdullah narrated that the Prophet ﷺ said: “Indeed, after me you will see preferential treatment, and matters that you dislike.” They said: “Then what do you command us [O Messenger of Allah!]” He said: “Give them their rights, and ask Allah for yours.” Jami` at-Tirmidhi 2190 

حَدَّثَنَا عَنْ عَبْدِ اللَّهِ، عَنِ النَّبِيِّ صلى الله عليه وسلم قَالَ ‏”‏ إِنَّكُمْ سَتَرَوْنَ بَعْدِي أَثَرَةً وَأُمُورًا تُنْكِرُونَهَا ‏”‏ ‏.‏ قَالُوا فَمَا تَأْمُرُنَا يَا رَسُولَ اللَّهِ قَالَ ‏”‏ أَدُّوا إِلَيْهِمْ حَقَّهُمْ وَسَلُوا اللَّهَ الَّذِي لَكُمْ ‏”‏

It was narrated from Umm Salamah (Allah be pleased with her) that the Messenger of Allah ﷺ said: “You refer your disputes to me and I am only human. Perhaps some of you may be more eloquent in presenting your case than others, so I rule in your favour because of what I hear from you. If I pass a judgement in favour of one of you that detracts from his brother’s rights, then he should not take it, because it is a piece of fire that is given to him which he will bring forth on the Day Resurrection.” (Sunan Ibn Majah, Vol. 3, Book 13, Hadith 10)

3. Seeking name and fame is blameworthy in all circumstances. The believer should be modest and humble, and he should not like to be chosen. One of the main factors that corrupt a person’s efforts to reach his Lord is his love of fame and prominence among people, and the love of leadership over them.

At-Tirmidhi (2376) narrated – and classed it as saheeh – that Ka‘b ibn Malik (Allah be pleased with him) said: The Messenger of Allah ﷺ said: “Two hungry wolves sent against a flock of sheep cannot cause more damage to them than a man’s eagerness for wealth and prominence causes to his religious commitment.”

One of the worst outcomes of the love of fame and prominence, and striving for it, is for a person to seek the praise of people, whether it is deserved or not.

Ahmad (16460) narrated that Mu‘awiyah (may Allah be pleased with him) said: I heard the Messenger of Allah ﷺ say: “Beware of praising one another, for it is like slaughter (i.e., fatal).”

Al-Mannawi (may Allah have mercy on him) said: Praise leads to self-admiration and arrogance, and it is fatal like slaughter, hence it is likened to it. Imam Ghazali (Allah have mercy on him) said: If someone does you a favour, if he is one of those who like to be thanked and praised, then do not praise him, because part of fulfilling his rights is that you should not approve of his wrongdoing, and his seeking thanks is wrongdoing. Otherwise, you may show him gratitude so that he will continue doing good.

Ibraheem an-Nakha‘i (Allah have mercy on him) and al-Hasan al-Basri (Allah have mercy on him) said: It is sufficient trial for a man to be pointed out with regard to religious or worldly matters, except the one whom Allah protects.

End quote from az-Zuhd by Ibn as-Sirri (2/442).

Once we understand this, there can be no doubt that it is safer for a man to prefer anonymity and be humble towards his Lord, and to refrain from seeking fame and prominence, even with regard to permissible worldly matters.

4. Shukr – Be grateful to Allah for the position you have been given. You should pray 2 rak’ahs daily thanking Allah for this blessing and pleading to him for his help to guide you.

5.Humility – A quality which is found in very few leaders and people in power. The saying is famous, “Money and Power changes everyone.” People forget who they were and where they were. Money makes people delusional and power leads people to think they are above the law of the land and the law of Allah. Some men have no fear of god, whilst others think they are actually almighty god. The Prophet ﷺ  once said ‘the leader of a people is their servant’. He demonstrated this throughout his life from personally building his mosque to partaking in digging during the battle of the Trench. He was not a self-serving in of a higher cause. This was accompanied by humility and living a simple life. He didn’t have a throne and sat among his people as one of them, such that when foreign visitors came, they could not immediately tell from a gathering who the Prophet ﷺ was.

6. Patience and Wisdom – The Prophetﷺ  was wise but practical at the same time. Once a Bedouin came to the mosque of the Prophet ﷺ and when the call of nature came he began urinating within the mosque and prayer area. Naturally this infuriated the other worshippers and companions of the Prophet ﷺ who started marching towards him in anger. The Prophet ﷺ intervened, not only by stopping the possibility of the Bedouin getting beaten up, but actually told the worshippers to let the Bedouin finish urinating!

This was not only very considerate of him but most wise. He ﷺ recognised that this was not an act of aggression but rather the simple Bedouin did not know about the etiquettes of the mosque and needed to be taught. This was the wisdom of the great teacher—the Prophet ﷺ, who proceeded to counsel the foolhardy Bedouin.

One of the most apparent qualities of the Prophet was his incredible patience. For 13 years he endured abuse and persecution at the hands of his fellow Makkans, including times when his companions were beaten, tortured and in some cases killed. Even the Prophet ﷺ wasn’t spared having animal entrails thrown at him as he prayed. One of his most perilous moments was in Ta’if when the people and their children stoned the beloved Prophet ﷺ until he was bleeding extensively.

Yet he had to remain patient and resilient through the suffering while painfully seeing his beloved followers grossly mistreated. His internal strength and patience, gave his followers strength and patience until God gave them some ease.

7. Courage, Compassion and Competence was in abundance in the Prophet ﷺ who sought to reflect the compassion of the Divine. Once, an elderly who would regularly throw rubbish in the pathway of the Prophet ﷺ fell ill. In seeing this, the Prophet ﷺ did not celebrate this situation rather showed care and compassion by going to visit the old woman, and preparing food for her. His courage was apparent during every battle and every challenging period faced by his people. Once at night during the Madinan period, the companions were awoken by a frightening loud noise. As they cautiously stepped out of their homes to see what was going on, they saw it was an out of control horse, but luckily someone brave had swiftly come out and brought the horse under control. It was none other than the courageous Prophet ﷺ.

He embodied the Quranic framework of Al-Qawi Wal Amin. Hence strong, competence and able, while being trustworthy. Today we find that sometimes good people aren’t the most competent, while the most competent aren’t always being good. The Prophet ﷺ role modelled the need to be both. He was known to be an able communicator who had the gift of ‘jawam’ul kalim’—a poetic way with words enabling him to say much with only a few words. He was an expert swordsman, with excellent equestrian skills but also had day to day practical skills from construction to sewing.

With regard to the imam’s role in society, there is no doubt that it is an important role. How can it be otherwise when he is leading the prayers which are the most important pillar of Islam after the Shahaadatayn (twin testimony of faith)? The Imam is the leader and the worshippers behind him are his followers. The imam guides and leads his jama’ah (group) by giving lessons and talks. The Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) and the Rightly-Guided khaleefahs used to hold gatherings in the mosques where the Muslims would gather so that they might consult with one another concerning religious and worldly matters and so that they might teach the people about Tawheed, fiqh, good manners, and also enjoin what is good and forbid what is evil.” 

See Ahkam al-Imamah wa’l-I’timam fi’l-Salah by al-Muneef, p. 64 

The imam should check up on those who are absent (from the prayers), and visit the sick, He should strive to meet the needs of the Muslims who pray with him, teaching the ignorant, admonishing the negligent, advising the erring, reconciling those among whom there are differences, bringing them closer to one another and striving to foster friendship and love between them. He should strive to solve social problems that arise among them such as family quarrels, disputes between neighbours and the like. To sum up, the role of the imam is very important and should be appreciated as such. The group should help him to achieve the aims of sharee’ah and ward off anything that is bad or harmful. And Allah is the Source of strength.

The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) said: The whole Muslim is sacred to another Muslim: his blood, his property and his honour

Ismail Ibn Nazir Satia (one who is in dire need of Allah’s forgiveness, mercy and pleasure)

Categories
Ramadhan

Ramadhan Is Over

Ramadhan is over
And we need to continue the spirituality,
But we all know the reality,
Just look at the Masjid in your nearest locality,
Ramadhan is over and so is its hospitality,

Did you change and improve your personality?
Is Islam in your blood, is it a practicality?
Will it remain another 11 months, what is the possibility?
Or have you already exhaled all your spiritual oxygen, is that a probability?
So before you return to normality,
Remember that in your grave only good deeds matter, not your wealth or financial stability.

Ismail ibn Nazir Satia (one who is in dire need of Allah’s forgiveness, mercy and pleasure)

1 Shawwal 1440

Categories
Marriage

10 Ways to be the Ideal Muslim Husband

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

images (3)Zainab bint Younus, Canada

MARITAL ADVICE LISTS are common to find in Muslim literature and lectures, yet the information is almost always targeted towards women. However, we all know that it takes two to tango – and so here is a list aimed at Muslim husbands in the hopes that they, too, will benefit and be able to improve their relationships.

1. Have taqwa and isân

Know that you are responsible for your end of the marriage, regardless of how the other party treats you. Fulfill your wife’s rights without demanding yours first, and know that you seek Allah’s Pleasure over anyone else’s. Do your job with excellence, and don’t make it conditional. Isân is not merely to worship in the ritual sense, but to conduct oneself in general with an awareness that Allah is Al-Raqîb (the Ever-Watchful), and to fulfill one’s duties in the best of manners.

Then he (Jibrîl) said, “Inform me about isân.” He (the Messenger of Allah) answered, “It is that you should serve Allah as though you could see Him, for though you cannot see Him yet (know that) He sees you.” (Muslim)

2. Respect her

Remember that Allah describes marriage as a bond of love and mercy – love ebbs and flows, but mercy and respect must always be there, even – especially – in times of conflict. Unfortunately, we tend to present respect as a quality that men need (“men need respect, women need affection”). The truth is, however, that one can love someone without respecting them… and this is very, very dangerous. To have mercy and respect one’s wife is to never assume that she exists merely as an extension of you or to serve your needs. To respect her is to honor her, to defend her from harm and others’ accusations, and to have husn al-ann of her.

In cases of disagreement, this respect translates as not forcing your own opinion upon her when there is Islamically acceptable room for differences of opinion.

It should go without saying, but unfortunately it bears repeating nonetheless – respecting your wife means never, ever, abusing her, physically or otherwise.

“And of His signs is that He created for you from yourselves mates that you may find tranquillity in them; and He placed between you affection and mercy. Indeed in that are signs for a people who give thought.”  [Sûrat Al-Rûm, 30:21]

Even in times of conflict, Allah tells us to behave in the most respectful and gracious of manners:

And do not forget graciousness between you.  [Sûrat Al-Baqarah, 2:237]

Abû Mûsa Al-Ashʿari (May Allah be pleased with him) reported:

I asked the Messenger of Allah: “Who is the most excellent among the Muslims?” He said, “One from whose tongue and hands the other Muslims are secure.”  [1]

3.  Be emotionally intelligent

Empathy, being attuned to the other person’s preferences, learning to understand their personality and responding appropriately without expecting to change them into something they’re not… supporting and respecting each other as both individuals and as a team. The Prophet ﷺ was an emotionally intelligent husband, who knew the differences in his wives’ personalities and interacted with them in a manner best suited to each woman. He comforted Ṣufiyyah when she wept; he had spirited discussions with ʿÂishah (May Allah be pleased with her) and he encouraged Ḥafṣah’s (May Allah be pleased with her) for knowledge.

In a famous narration known as the Hadith of Abu Zarʿ(May Allah be pleased with him) [2]  ʿAishah told the Prophet ﷺ the story of eleven women who sat together and described their husbands’ qualities and behaviours. The eleventh woman, Umm Zarʿ, described Abû Zarʿas a man who was extremely generous to his wife, showering her with gifts; who went out of his way to please her; who never rebuked her or verbally abused her; who made sure that she was comfortable and satisfied. To Umm Zarʿ, there was no greater husband than Abû Zarʿ- and the Prophet ﷺ himself told ʿÂishah, I am to you as Abû Zarʿwas to Umm Zarʿ, except that I will never divorce you.

4.  Be a True Qawwâm

Know that being a qawwâm is a matter of being a good leader – not authoritarian or a dictator, but someone who inspires love and respect, who treats others with dignity and respect… The popular book 7 Habits of Highly Effective People is a great resource for understanding what good leadership is. There are several excellent Islamic resources discussing leadership lessons from the life of the Prophet ﷺ.  [3]  [4]   Strive to embody the Sunnah in your character, not just in how many rakʿahs a day you pray.

ʿÂishah RA described the Prophet thus: “His character was the Quran.” [5] Be the type of husband that a wife describes in such a manner.

Remember that as a qawwâm, you are responsible and accountable for the well-being of your household and those under your care.

The Messenger of Allah ﷺ said:

“Each of you is a shepherd and each of you is responsible for his flock. The amîr (ruler) who is over the people is a shepherd and is responsible for his flock; a man is a shepherd in charge of the inhabitants of his household and he is responsible for his flock…”  [6]

5.  Be friends before you become spouses

That might sound odd (or not) – but we often put so much pressure on ourselves to fulfill a role (husband/wife), that we forget to get to know each other as friends first. Every marriage will go through ups and downs, intimately and otherwise… and you’ll be surprised to realize how much having a solid, sincere friendship can pull you through the hard times.

One example of RasûlAllah’s “friendship” with his wives is his relationship with Sawdah bint Zamʿah RA. She was the first woman whom he married after the death of Khadijah, and although she was considered to be elderly and not as beautiful as the other women whom he would later marry, their relationship was one of camaraderie, confidence, and laughter.  [7]

6.  Don’t be embarrassed or ignorant of female biology

Learn about it – from menstruation to female sexuality to pregnancy and everything else. You need to know this stuff – it will impact your life significantly, intimately and otherwise. Don’t laugh it off or act as though it’s not worth your time and attention. Women’s health is sorely misunderstood, and having a disinterested (or worse, disgusted) husband can make things even more difficult for women.

The Prophet ﷺ did not shy away from these matters, either as a husband or as a Messenger of Allah. Instead, he constantly enjoined men to be aware of and sensitive to their wives’ needs – just as he was with his wives.

Narrated Umm Salamah RA:

While I was laying with the Prophet ﷺ under a single woolen sheet, I got the menses. I slipped away and put on the clothes for menses. He said, “Have you got “nifâs” (menses)?” I replied, “Yes.” He then called me and made me lie with him under the same sheet.   [8]

7.  Be responsible

Being “a good Muslim husband” doesn’t just mean fulfilling the basic rights as a husband and leaving it at that. Being a good Muslim husband means that you are on the ball as a responsible adult – whether it’s paying the bills, taking out the trash, cleaning a mess in the house, or being an engaged father (not ‘babysitting’). Doing these things is not a “kindness to the wife,” or “helping out at home.” It’s not “extra credit” and deserving of lavish praise. It is part and parcel of being a grown man responsible for his surroundings, his family, and himself. Do these things out of mindfulness that Allah will never waste your efforts for His Sake.

Narrated Al-Aswad RA:

I asked ʿÂishah what did the Prophet use to do at home. She replied. “He used to keep himself busy serving his family and when it was time for the prayer, he would get up for prayer.” (Bukhâri)

ʿÂishah RA reported:

I was asked, “What did the Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings be upon him, do in his house?” I said, “The Prophet was a man among men. He would remove fleas from his clothes, milk his sheep, and serve himself.” (Musnad Ahmad 25662)

8.  Don’t pursue your nawâfil at the expense of your wife’s farâi

One issue that many men fall into is that in their zeal to engage more in ʿibâda, they end up burdening their wives even more – to the extent that she is barely able to pray her five alawât with khushûʿ. Both spouses should encourage and facilitate opportunities for each other to strengthen as Muslims, but mothers of young children especially need their husbands to step up so that they can have the necessary time they need to reconnect with Allah and flourish spiritually. (And no, that doesn’t just mean five minutes here and there.)

Ramadan is a time when this becomes more obvious than ever – for example, many men will go to alat Al-arâwî while leaving their wives to deal with the children, in addition to having cooked ifâr beforehand. On a daily basis, though, go out of your way to facilitate your wife’s ʿibâda and spiritual connection.

Narrated Abû Juḥaifah RA:

The Prophet ﷺ made a bond of brotherhood between Salmân Al-Fârisi RA and Abû Al-Dardâ’ RA. Salmân RA paid a visit to Abû Al-Dardâ’ RA and found Umm Al-Dardâ’ RA dressed in shabby clothes and asked her why she was in that state. She replied, “Your brother Abû Al-Dardâ’ R is not interested in (the luxuries of) this world.”

In the meantime Abû Al-Dardâ’ RA came and prepared a meal for Salmân RA. Salmân RA requested Abû Al-Dardâ’ RA to eat (with him), but Abû Al-Dardâ’ RA said, “I am fasting.” Salmân RA said, “I am not going to eat unless you eat.”

So, Abû Al-Dardâ’ RA ate (with Salmân). When it was night and (a part of the night had passed), Abû Al-Dardâ’ RA got up (to offer the night prayer), but Salmân RA told him to sleep and Abû Al-Dardâ’ RA slept.

After sometime Abû Al-Dardâ’ RA again got up but Salmân RA told him to sleep. When it was the last hours of the night, Salmân RA told him to get up then, and both of them offered the prayer.

Salmân RA told Abû Al-Dardâ’ RA, “Your Lord has a right on you, your soul has a right on you, and your family has a right on you; so you should give the rights of all those who has a right on you.”

Abû Al-Dardâ’ RA came to the Prophet ﷺ and narrated the whole story. The Prophet ﷺ said, “Salmân RA has spoken the truth.”   [9]

9.  Learn conflict resolution skills

One big reason that couples end up going to Shuyûkh for counseling is because they simply haven’t learned how to communicate and resolve conflicts in a healthy manner. It’s not even about one specific issue or another; it’s about learning how to deal with whatever issues arise, in the most respectful and appropriate manner possible.  [10]

The Quran and Sunnah urge positive reconciliation between believers, and especially between husbands and wives.

“And live with them honourably. For if you dislike them – perhaps you dislike a thing and Allah makes therein much good.” [Sûrat Al-Nisâ’, 4:19]

“And if a woman fears from her husband contempt or evasion, there is no sin upon them if they make terms of settlement between them – and settlement is best. And present in [human] souls is stinginess. But if you do good and fear Allah – then indeed Allah is ever with what you do, Acquainted.” [Sûrat Al-Nisâ’, 4:128]

10. Love your wife for who she is

Not because she’s the person who cooks for you or does your laundry. Not because she’s the mother of your child(ren). Not because you’ve settled into routine and you feel comfortable having her around and she knows how to work the coffee maker and where the family’s paperwork is filed. Love her for her. Her personality traits, her talents, her hobbies, the things about her that make her unique.

Notice them, appreciate them, compliment them. Let her know that you don’t just see her as wife or mother, but as an individual on her own. Know that long before she married you, indeed long before she was born to her own parents, she was created as a separate soul – a human being whose primary identity is as a slave of Allah.

And most importantly – let her know that you love her, with all the pride and openness that RasûlAllah ﷺ demonstrated when he was asked, “Who do you love most?” and he responded, simply and beautifully, “ʿÂishah.”   [11]

There are of course numerous other pieces of advice that can be dispensed on the topic – everything from giving gifts to resolving in-law issues to arranging date-nights and so on. However, more important than specific behaviours are the principles behind them – and it these principles which have been highlighted.

In short, Muslim men should strive to match the standards set by RasûlAllah ﷺ when he said:

“The best of you are those who are the best to their wives, and I am the best of you to my wives.”   [12]

————————–

[1] http://sunnah.com/riyadussaliheen/18/2

[2] http://sunnah.com/bukhari/67/123

[3] http://muslimmatters.org/2014/10/28/lessons-in-leadership-from-the-prophet-muhammad-saw/ and http://muslimmatters.org/2014/11/04/21-lessons-in-leadership-from-the-prophet-part-2/

[4] https://theislamicworkplace.com/2006/11/15/the-leadership-process-of-muhammad-s-from-hadith/

[5] http://sunnah.com/urn/2203080

[6] http://sunnah.com/abudawud/20/1

[7] http://thesalafifeminist.blogspot.ca/2014/08/his-laughter-her-love.html

[8] http://sunnah.com/bukhari/6/5

[9] http://sahaba.net/salman-farisi-rights/

[10] https://aljumuah.com/cooling-the-fires-of-marriage-part-1-an-approach-to-conflict-resolution/

[11] http://sunnah.com/bukhari/64/384

[12] Narrated by Al-Tirmidhi, 3895; Ibn Mâjah, 1977; classed as saî by al-Albaani in Saî al-Tirmidhi

ZAINAB BINT YOUNUS

Zainab bint Younus is a Canadian Muslimah who has been active in grassroots da’wah and writing about Islam and the Ummah for the last nine years. She was first published in al-Ameen Newspaper (Vancouver, Canada) at the age of 14, became a co-founder, editor, and writer for MuslimMatters.org at 16; and began writing regularly for SISTERS Magazine at the age of 19 until today. She also blogs regularly at The Salafi Feminist
Categories
Poems

Centre of the World; Centre of Islam

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

kabah 1
Behold its grandeur and dazzling beauty,
Behold its magnificence and majestic aura,
Enlightened with mercy in its perfect form.
In the land of the Prophets AS, the land of Wahy,
The tall, towering Kabah, welcomes all of humanity.
It was in this mountainous city, it was amongst a tribal nation, a light was born,
The noor from Allah and finally the curtains were drawn.
The city is blessed; from an army of elephants ? it was protected,
Darkness turned to light when Muhammed SAW was selected.
Oh Muhammad (SAW), the pain you endured. Oh the most perfect creation.
Your elegance, your sanctity, your endless magnanimity.
O Kabah! O house of Allah! O beautiful Haram!
Your elegance, your sanctity, your endless magnanimity.
May my mother and father be sacrificed for you both.
So solemnly you stand, so peaceful in tranquility,
May your greatness extend till forever and ever, till eternity.
Not a bird can fly over you nor any planes,
Your serenity and dignity is not defeated by these looming cranes.
Every night and every day,
120 levels of mercy descend your way.
60 upon those doing tawaf,
40 upon those in Salah,
20 upon those gazing at you lovingly.
Not a single soul here is deprived.
 Echoes of Talbiyah can be heard, let this Sunnah be revived.
I gaze above, my head I raise, thousands upon thousands crowded, multicoloured, multicultural flowing in multitudes circumambulating this holy place.
All walking, praying, chanting in different languages at a different pace.
Some with speed, to increase their deeds,
Whilst others steady on, looking out for each and every one.
Muslim unity can be seen all around,
Different languages, dialects, colours and castes, all under one awe-inspiring mast.
Lebanon ??Turkey ?? India ?? Pakistan ?? Nigeria ??…
Indonesia ?? Malaysia ?? Australia ?? and Algeria ??
kabah 3.jpg
Towards my right clinging on to the Multazam,
Begging Allah, waiting for the mercy to come.
As I look behind me,
I see the well of Zamzam which will flow till eternity.
Some sipping their cups and some filling their jugs,
Completing Tawaf and ending Umrah with smiles and hugs ?
Mubarak ho! Hayyakymullah! TaqaballAllah can be heard!
Allah accept every step and every word.
This poem was written to inspire and increase our love for the Haramayn Shareefayn, to instil its beauty and dignity in our hearts. Allah accept my efforts and reignite our love for the holy lands.
Ismail ibn Nazir Satia, Makkatul Mukarramah. 
5 Ramadhan 1439
kaaba-2
Categories
Poems

I am a Mustish?!

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

britishI am a Muslim. I am British.
I am British. I am a Muslim.
I am a British Muslim.
Do the order of words REALLY matter?
Muslim British, British Muslim.
A cup of tea is what I crave,
Digestives and Custard Creams are my fave.
At the same time, the headscarf I wear,
And YouTube I scour to fashion it with care.
Awkward weather conversations and polite queuing,
HP sauce, marmite and cows mooing.
At the same time, I rush out to perform my prayer,
Because for me, this makes my daily endeavours clear.
You tell me I must choose,
But neither I am willing to lose.
For both are a part of me,
So please, allow me to be.
I am a Muslim. I am British.
I am British. I am a Muslim.
I am a British Muslim.
Do the order of words REALLY matter?
Muslim British, British Muslim.
Mus-tish?
Written by Apa Fatima Ahmed, Teacher at Islamiyah School, (Masjid Sajedeen Open Day 2018).
mustish
Categories
Ramadhan

They think it’s all over!

vanda-teixeira-632984-unsplash.jpgAs Ramadhan draws to an end, in these last ten days we will see Masajid all over the UK complete their Qur’an in Taraweeh. 1000s of Qur’an will be completed all over the UK. Aside from that, most of us who do our personal reading will also complete our tilawah in our homes, along with our womenfolk and children! It’s the 23rd night tonight and a thought came to my mind.  Where I come from we have forty Masajid (Blackburn), Alhumdu Lillah – 40 in such a small town. Many Masajid have 2 or even 3 Taraweeh! It can safely be said, in this ONE town over *100 Quran* will be completed in Taraweeh! Not forgetting those who lead Taraweeh in their homes – Subhan Allah!
Brothers and Sisters, this is all from the sheer mercy of Allah SWT. Without His help, nothing, and I mean NOTHING is possible. What provoked me to share this message was a lecture delivered by our guest from South Africa, Mufti Abdul Kader Hoosen saheb. He is currently in Jaame Masjid delivering talks daily. He gave a Khutbah last Friday in Masjid Sajedeen and mentioned he had been to South America recently. He pointed out that what we have in Blackburn ALONE is not available in certain countries, especially those in South America. Some don’t have a *single* masjid, only 3 Musalla in one of those countries. They don’t have many Ulama or Hafidh. A recent count in Blackburn totalled almost 300 Ulama – Allah make them like the companions of Badr which were also just over 300. We must have double that number of Hafidh, in Blackburn.
But let us not be complacent – the tables can turn. There are countries which had far, far more than us… but there today, Muslims remain just by name- Allah protect us.
To conclude, let us keep our spirits up after Ramadhan and for the rest of our lives, in sha Allah. Preserve the future generations to come. And pray for a good leader in the UK.
(Dua for a fair and just leader)
اللهم لا تسلط علينا من لا يخافك فينا
ولا يرحمنا
Allahumma laa tusallit alaynaa mal laa ya khaafuka feenaa walaa yarhamunaa
O Allah! Do not give authority (to a leader) over us who doesn’t fear you and who doesn’t have mercy upon us.
These nights are the best nights of the year and there are moments of acceptance hidden in them; don’t miss out!
Ismail Satia,
Blackburn
23rd Ramadhan.
Categories
Shaykh Saleem Dhorat

Love for the Masjid

By Hadrat Mawlānā Muhammad Saleem Dhorat hafizahullāh

It should be the desire of every Muslim to be in the House of Allāh ta‘ālā at all times. A Muslim should feel that if he had no commitments, he would have spent his entire time in the masjid. The heart should always yearn to be in the place most beloved to Allāh ta‘ālā. Any place beloved to Allāh will certainly become beloved to the person who has love for Allāh ta‘ālā, and Love of Allāh ta‘ālā is an essential requisite of Īmān. In one hadīth Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam has said: “The most beloved places to Allāh ta‘ālā are the masājid.” (Muslim)

Even when he is occupied with matters of the world, such as family, work, etc., the heart of a Muslim should always be attached to the masjid. The Prophet sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam has stated in one hadīth that the condition of a believer outside the masjid is that of a fish out of water. A fish obviously has no desire to be out of water and if it is taken out, will long to return, and will remain restless for as long as it is out of water. In the same hadīth, the sign of a munāfiq (hypocrite) has been described as a bird in a cage, longing to be released therefrom as soon as possible. A munāfiq anxiously waits for the salāh or speech to end, so he can leave. The point to reflect upon is that do we feel restless outside the masjid, longing to return to it, and if not, then are we not displaying the sign of a munāfiq?

This hadīth encourages us to inculcate love for the masājid, thereby visiting them frequently and remaining within for as long as possible. If for any particular reason, or due to worldly necessities, one cannot remain longer in the masjid, the desire for staying longer and the urge to return at the first opportunity should at least be present in the heart. It is indeed regrettable to witness that even when not preoccupied with necessary commitments, many Muslims, at salāh times, remain sitting at home or wandering the streets instead of attending the masājid and performing salāh. And even if they do attend, they will make a point to come as late as possible and leave immediately after salāh, only to ‘hang around’ outside with friends. Many have become so negligent that in their haste to leave, they discard the performance of sunnah mu’akkadah as well.

The sunnah salāh has been divided into two categories, mu’akkadah and ghayr mu’akkadah. The sunnah mu’akkadah are those, which Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam used to perform with punctuality, and exhorted the Ummah to do the same, except on a journey when there is scope for omitting them. Sunnah ghayr mu’akkadah are the non-emphasised sunnah salāh, which Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallamused to perform on a regular basis but had omitted them at times as well, so that the Ummah could differentiate between the two. Many people never perform these at all.

Nowadays, we tend to believe that the sunnah ghayr mu’akkadah (the non-emphasised sunnah salāh) are those which Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam only performed occasionally. This is the definition that we have in our minds today. This is the very reason why we find a very small number of people performing the sunnah ghayr mu’akkadah. This is indeed a very grave misconception. We should make it a point to perform these with the regularity they deserve.

Coming back to the main topic, I wish to stress once again that love for the masjid (which is indicated by the desire to be present therein) is a necessary requirement. Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam has said: “There are seven (types of persons) whom Allāh will give protection with His Shade on the Day when there will be no shade except His Shade:…(one of them is) a person whose heart is attached to the masjid…” (Al-Bukhārī, Muslim)

If, however, such inclination does not exist within the heart, then it should be created by  compelling oneself to come to the masjid at least fifteen to twenty minutes before jamā‘ah (congregational prayer) time and engage in some form of  ‘ibādah. If one finds it difficult to come any earlier than the jamā‘ah time, then one should try and spend some time after the salāh. Moreover, it would also be beneficial to participate in the regular durūs (lessons of Qur’ān or Hadīth) or similar Dīnī lectures that take place in the masjid. 

The benefits of visiting the masājid are numerous. Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam has said: “He who purifies himself in his house and then walks to one of the Houses of Allāh for performing an obligatory act (salāh), one step of his will wipe out his sins and another step will exalt him in status (in Paradise).” (Muslim)

Furthermore, just by entering the masjid with the right foot, one would be gaining the immense reward of practising a sunnah of Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam. By reciting the prescribed du‘ā (for this occasion) another sunnah would be accomplished. By making the intention of i‘tikāf, at the time of entering, the entire time spent within the masjid will bear the reward of i‘tikāf as well. Besides, one’s presence in the masjid (provided one does not engage in talking about worldly matters) will save one from impermissible speech and actions, which may possibly have been carried out by one outside the masjid.

It has to be remembered that to engage in anything related to worldly affairs whilst in the masjid is not allowed. The acts permissible in the masjid are those which relate to the Remembrance of Allāh ta‘ālā, such as the recitation of the Qur’ān, dhikr, listening to speeches or durūs (lessons) of Qur’ān & Ahādīth, etc. Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam has said: “The masājid are constructed only for the Remembrance of Allāh and salāh.” (Ibn Mājah)

One more virtue of the masjid pertains to one’s closeness with the imām when insalāh. The closer one is, the more virtuous becomes one’s salāh. Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam has said: “If people came to know of the blessing of (saying) adhān and (performing salāh in) the first row, they would resort to drawing lots if they had to (to secure these privileges).” (Al-Bukhārī, Muslim)

As we are unaware of the reality of the spiritual world, we have become neglectful of even such great and virtuous acts. In order to understand this, it would help to cite an example in purely materialistic terms. If for instance, a masjid was to announce that all those performing salāh in the first row would be awarded a sum as little as five pounds, for every salāh, one would witness that the first row would be filled up well before the beginning of salāh. Although not a big sum of money, but multiply it by five (for the five daily salāh) and then multiply that by seven (for the seven days of the week), it would add up to a week’s wages. This would certainly attract people to the first row. Unfortunately, we haven’t accorded even the importance and value of five pounds to the virtue mentioned by Rasūlullāh sallallāhu ‘alayhi wasallam.

Dear friends, when we come to the masjid, we should endeavour to obtain a place in the first row. We have plenty of time to talk and gossip outside salāh times. Leave all the mundane activities for another time and come and sit as close to the imām as possible. We should realise that there is a force keeping us away from this reward (and other such rewards) and this is the evil force of shaytān. We have to learn to fight shaytān and endeavour to get closer to Allāh ta‘ālā.  

INTENTIONS FOR GOING TO THE MASJID

Many intentions can be made when going to the masjid. Remember, for each intention a separate reward will be attained. Listed below are some possible intentions that can be made.

1. To perform salāh.

2. For going to the House of Allāh ta‘ālā.

3. To obtain reward for the time spent while awaiting the congregation of thesalāh.

4. For the limbs to be safeguarded from sins.

5. For nafl (optional) i‘tikāf.

6. To remember Allāh ta‘ālā in seclusion.

7. To meet fellow Muslim brothers.

8. For the reward of salām (greeting other brothers).

9. For reciting the du‘ā when entering and leaving the masjid.

10. For reciting the Qur’ān.

11. For an opportunity for amr bil ma‘rūf and nahy ‘anil munkar (to enjoin what is right and forbid what is evil).

May Allāh ta‘ālā forgive our sins and overlook our shortcomings and may He grant us the correct understanding of Dīn and His Pleasure. Āmīn.

© Islāmic Da’wah Academy


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